Victor Saucier a.k.a. Pasadena Solider, the Spring / Summer 2013 JFF Super Bowl Champion, has abruptly quit the league for the second time in the last four seasons of The JFF Madden NFL (PS4) Online League.

Soldier won the league Super Bowl in late June of 2013 after going 16-0-0 in the Regular Season and 3-0-0 in the playoffs, but then later, after establishing a 5-0-0 record in the first few weeks of the Fall 2013 season, he abruptly quit the league stating at the time that his schedule was “too busy” for him to continue with JFF league activities (more about that here).

In this instance, Soldier’s JFF San Francisco 49ers started out a disappointing 3-4-0, losing to the JFF Dallas Cowboys (Cliff), JFF Arizona Cardinals (Damian), JFF Kansas City Chiefs (Shady) and most recently, the JFF Denver Broncos (Kory G), who were playing without their inured starting QB Peyton Manning.

Beginning with Week #3 of the Preseason, Soldier had expressed displeasure with the league’s slider settings, citing the discrepancy between the Player (Human User) Skills slider settings and the CPU Skills slider settings. “I believe the league’s slider settings benefit those league members who allow the CPU to do everything for them more so than it does league members like myself who manually controls as many players on the field as possible,” said Soldier, shortly after his JFF 49ers lost 38-34 to Shady’s JFF Chiefs in Week Five.

There are six categories where the Player (Human User) Skills slider settings and the CPU Skills slider settings are different:

1) QB Accuracy

Player (Human User) Skills slider setting: 40 / 100
CPU Skills slider setting: 60 / 100
What this means in practical terms: When the slider setting is less than the default (50 / 100), this means that only the quarterbacks who have a high THA (Throw Accuracy Rating), SAC (Short Throw Accuracy), MAC (Medium Throw Accuracy), and DAC (Deep Throw Accuracy) rating will consistently hit their receivers on the mark. For example, quarterbacks such as Tom Brady (JFF Patriots), Andrew Luck (JFF Colts), Peyton Manning (JFF Broncos), Tony Romo (JFF Cowboys), and Aaron Rodgers (JFF Packers) would not be negatively affected by the 40 / 100 slider setting. Even Soldier’s own QB, Blaine Gabbert, had a SAC rating of 85, a MAC rating of 85, and a DAC rating of 82.

On the opposite end, when the slider setting for QB Accuracy is above the default (50 / 100), this means that even quarterbacks in the league who have average to less-than-average accuracy ratings would be able to have great passing performances. A few examples of starting quarterbacks who have less-than-average accuracy ratings would be Jay Cutler (JFF Bears), Robert Griffin III (JFF Redskins), and Terrelle Pryor (JFF Bills)

2) WR Catching

Player (Human User) Skills slider setting: 40 / 100
CPU Skills slider setting: 60 / 100
What this means in practical terms: When the slider setting is less than the default (50 / 100), this means that only the wide receivers, tight ends, and running backs who have a high CTH (Catching), CIT (Catch in Traffic), and SPC (Spectacular Catch) rating will consistently catch passes from their quarterbacks without dropping the ball too much once they are hit or tackled. For example, receivers such as Dez Bryant (JFF Cowboys), A.J. Green (JFF Bengals), Rob Gronkowski (JFF Patriots), Mike Evans and Vincent Jackson (JFF Buccaneers), Alshon Jeffery (JFF Bears), DeMaryius Thomas (JFF Broncos) would not be negatively affected by the 40 / 100 slider setting. Soldier’s two best receivers were Anquan Boldin (CTH – 91, CIT – 98, SPC – 87) and Torrey Smith (CTH – 87, CIT – 86, SPC – 87).

On the opposite end, when the slider setting for WR Catching is above the default (50 / 100), this means that even wide receivers, tight ends, and running backs in the league who have average to less-than-average catching ratings would find themselves rarely dropping the ball when they are hit or tackled. A few examples of starting receivers who have less-than-average catching ratings would be Dri Archer (JFF Steelers), Marquise Goodwin (JFF Bills), and Louis Murphy, Jr. (JFF Buccaneers).

3) Fumbles

Player (Human User) Skills slider setting: 60 / 100
CPU Skills slider setting: 40 / 100
What this means in practical terms: This is the one slider setting discrepancy where the Player (Human User) skills slider settings are actually HIGHER than the default (50 / 100), while the CPU skills slider settings are actually LOWER than the default (for the other five categories where there is a discrepancy, it is just the opposite).

When the slider setting is less than the default (50 / 100), this means that only the halfbacks, fullbacks, quarterbacks, wide receivers, and tight ends who have a high CAR (Carry) rating will consistently hold on to the ball even when one or more defenders lays a hard hit on them right before tackling them or sacking them. For example, players such as Le’Veon Bell (JFF Steelers), Jamaal Charles (JFF Bills), Arian Foster (JFF Texans), Matt Forte (JFF Bears), Eddie Lacy (JFF Packers), Marshawn Lynch (JFF Seahawks), and LeSean McCoy (JFF Cardinals) would not be negatively affected by a slider setting of 45 / 100 or lower. Soldier’s two top running backs, Reggie Bush and Carlos Hyde, had a carry rating of 79 and 87 respectively. Bush committed two fumbles between JFF Week One and JFF Week Seven. QB Blaine Gabbert had a carry rating of 50 and committed three fumbles between JFF Week One and JFF Week Seven.

On the opposite end, when the slider setting for fumbles is above the default (50 / 100), this means that even halfbacks, fullbacks, quarterbacks, wide receivers, and tight ends in the league who have average to less-than-average carry ratings will more-than-likely hold on to the ball even if they suffer an extremely hard hit right before being sacked or tackled. A few examples of players who have less-than-average carry ratings who have committed very few if any fumbles would be Dri Archer (JFF Steelers), Bryce Brown (JFF Bills), Knile Davis (JFF Chiefs), and Lance Dunbar (JFF Cowboys).

4) Pass Defense Reaction Time

Player (Human User) Skills slider setting: 50 / 100
CPU Skills slider setting: 60 / 100
What this means in practical terms: When the slider setting is less than the default (50 / 100), this means that only defensive ends, defensive tackles, linebackers, and defensive backs who have high PMV (Power Moves), FMV (Finesse Moves), BSH (Block Shedding), and PUR (Pursuit) ratings will consistently be in a position to quickly distinguish between when the quarterback is handing off the ball to his running back for rushing attempt versus when the quarterback is executing a play-action fake and actually is going to pass the ball. These players will typically be able to hurry the quarterback’s pass, or even sack him before he gets a chance to pass the ball. For example, defenders such as Geno Atkins (JFF Bengals), LaVonte David (JFF Buccaneers), Robert Mathis (JFF Colts), Jerod Mayo (JFF Patriots), J.J. Watt (JFF Texans), and Kyle Williams (JFF Bills) among many others would not be negatively affected by the slider setting for Pass Defense Reaction Time being less than the default. The slider setting for this category is currently at the default (50 / 100).

On the opposite end, when the slider setting for Pass Defense Reaction Time is above the default, this means that even defensive ends, defensive tackles, linebackers, and defensive backs who have average to less-than-average PMV, FMV, BSH, and PUR ratings would be able to quickly respond to the quarterbacks passing attempts and quickly pursue him for a potential sack. Soldier’s JFF 49ers accumulated 17 team sacks between JFF Week One and JFF Week Seven, with LB Aldon Smith accumulating 6 sacks, DT Marcell Dareus accumulating 4 sacks, and linebackers Eli Houston and Lamarr Houston accumulating 2 sacks each.

5) Interceptions

Player (Human User) Skills slider setting: 35 / 100
CPU Skills slider setting: 50 / 100
What this means in practical terms: When the slider setting is less than the default (50 / 100), this means that only linebackers and defensive backs who have a high CTH (Catching) rating will be able to consistently intercept a pass from the opponent’s quarterback once they close in on the opponent’s receiver. For example, defenders such as DeAngelo Hall (JFF Redskins), Casey Hayward (JFF Packers), Tyrann Mathieu (JFF Cardinals), Patrick Peterson (JFF Chiefs), Richard Sherman (JFF Seahawks), Aqib Talib (JFF Broncos), and Alterraun Verner (JFF Buccaneers) among many others would not be negatively affected by the slider setting for Interceptions being less than the default. Right now, the top three defenders with the most interceptions (only teams with human user Owner / Coaches) in the league are Champ Bailey (JFF Steelers), Eric Berry (JFF Chiefs), and Logan Ryan (JFF Patriots) who each have accumulated 5 interceptions between JFF Week One and JFF Week Seven.

On the opposite end, when the slider setting for Interceptions is above the default, this means that even linebackers and defensive backs who have an average to less-than-average CTH rating would be accumulate a high number of interceptions throughout the season. Examples of league defenders who have three or more interceptions with relatively low CTH ratings would be Navorrow Bowman (JFF 49ers; CTH – 65), Vontae Davis (JFF Colts; CTH – 63), William Gay (JFF Steelers; CTH – 64), Rolando McClain (JFF Cowboys; CTH – 52), Sean Smith (JFF Cardinals; CTH – 66), Greg Toler (JFF Colts; CTH – 59), and Corey White (JFF Cowboys; CTH – 62). Soldier’s JFF 49ers accumulated 13 team interceptions between JFF Week One and JFF Week Seven, with LB Navorro Bowman accumulating 4 interceptions, SS Jaquiski Tartt accumulating 3 interceptions, and Cornerbacks Tramaine Brock and Marcus Sherels accumulating 2 interceptions each.

6) Tackling

Player (Human User) Skills slider setting: 50 / 100
CPU Skills slider setting: 60 / 100
What this means in practical terms: When the slider setting is less than the default (50 / 100), this means that only defenders who have a high TAK (Tackle) rating will be able to prevent offensive players, such as running backs and receivers, from breaking away or getting loose from an attempted tackle. For example, defenders such as Navorro Bowman (JFF 49ers), LaVonte David (JFF Buccaneers), Mike DeVito (JFF Chiefs), Dont’a Hightower (JFF Patriots), Sean Lee (JFF Cowboys), J.J. Watt (JFF Texans), Vince Wilfork (JFF Texans), and Patrick Willis (JFF Chiefs) among a few others would not be negatively affected by the slider setting for Tackling being less than the default. Right now, the top five defenders with the most tackles (only players on teams with human user Owner / Coaches) in the league between JFF Week One and JFF Week Seven are Navorro Bowman (JFF 49ers – 50 tackles), Barry Church (JFF Cowboys – 46 tackles), Jerod Mayo (JFF Patriots – 46 tackles), Lawrence Timmons (JFF Steelers – 46 tackles), and Rolando McClain (JFF Cowboys – 45 tackles).

On the opposite end, when the slider setting for Tackling is above the default, this means that even defenders who have an average to less-than-average TAK rating would be accumulate a high number of tackles throughout the season. Examples of league defenders who have an above-average number of tackles despite having a relatively low TAK rating would be Brandon Carr (JFF Cowboys), Kyle Fuller (JFF Bears), Dashon Goldson (JFF Redskins), Michael Huff (JFF Bills), George Iloka (JFF Bengals), Dwight Lowery (JFF Colts), Tyrann Mathieu (JFF Cardinals), and Corey White (JFF Cowboys). The leaders in tackles for Soldier’s JFF 49ers were Navorro Bowman (50), Eric Reid (42), Jaquiski Tartt (31), and Aldon Smith (27).

The general consensus among league members is that it was not the discrepancy in the slider settings above that was the genuine cause of Soldier quitting the league for the second time. It was more so that he grossly underestimated the level of competition that was in The JFF, and could not fathom the thought of continuing the season and run the possibility of missing the playoffs.

Who will The JFF Website Manager and Story Editor select as his ‘Mid-Season Offensive MVP’ and ‘Mid-Season Defensive MVP?

For the last ten seasons of the league, I have selected a ‘Mid-Season Offensive MVP’ and ‘Mid-Season Defensive MVP’ when I release my “Mid-Season Report Card.” Who are the top candidates for each award this season? I will announce my award winners along with four Runners-Up when I post my ‘Mid-Season Report Card’ after the completion of the Week Eight and Week Nine contests.

Top 12 candidates for JFF Mid-Season Offensive MVP

(in alphabetical order)

WR Dez Bryant – JFF Dallas Cowboys
HB Jamaal Charles – JFF Buffalo Bills
QB Andy Dalton – JFF Cincinnati Bengals
HB Lance Dunbar – JFF Dallas Cowboys
WR Mike Evans – JFF Tampa Bay Buccaneers
WR A.J. Green – JFF Cincinnati Bengals
TE Rob Gronkowski – JFF New England Patriots
QB Andrew Luck – JFF Indianapolis Colts
HB Eddie Lacy – JFF Green Bay Packers
HB LeSean McCoy – JFF Arizona Cardinals
QB Russell Wilson – JFF Seattle Seahawks
QB Jameis Winston – JFF Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Who do YOU think deserves to win The JFF’s Mid-Season Offensive MVP Award?

Top 12 candidates for JFF Mid-Season Defensive MVP

(in alphabetical order)

DT Geno Atkins – JFF Cincinnati Bengals
DB Champ Bailey – JFF Pittsburgh Steelers
DB Eric Berry – JFF Kansas City Chiefs
DB Morgan Burnett – JFF Green Bay Packers
DE Greg Hardy – JFF Dallas Cowboys
LB Bruce Irvin – JFF Seattle Seahawks
DB Tyrann Mathieu – JFF Arizona Cardinals
LB Jerod Mayo – JFF New England Patriots
DT Gerald McCoy – JFF Tampa Bay Buccaneers
DE Stephen Paea – JFF Washington Redskins
DB Logan Ryan – JFF New England Patriots
LB DeMarcus Ware – JFF Denver Broncos

Who do YOU think deserves to win The JFF’s Mid-Season Defensive MVP Award?

CLICK ON THE PHOTO BELOW to view this week’s edition of The JFF Power Rankings!

JFF Power Rankings - Installment #4